Where’s All The Noise Coming From?: A Spotlight on StoryTime

Where’s All The Noise Coming From?

The library!

But, I thought libraries were quiet?

love storytime, and that is definitely not a secret. But I also love StoryTime. What’s the difference you might ask? Storytime is the actual reading of a book to at least one person. The StoryTime Program at Books For Kids includes much more than just reading stories to children. It is composed of library storytime, book lending, book distributions, and family, teacher, and community literacy-based events.

So what is StoryTime like with Ms. Sam? LOUD! The louder, the better, in my opinion. When we read books that are interactive and fun, students should be able to participate. Reading is a social activity. When an adult reads a book they love, they share it with their friends. The same is true at the BFK libraries. During book lending, students proudly show their book selections to their friends. This is one of the reasons we have waiting lists for certain books (I’m talking about you, Peppa Pig).

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Over the past two years, I have formed strong bonds with the children in the libraries I visit, and Wednesday afternoons and Thursday mornings are my favorite days of the week. When the children see me in the halls, their eyes get big and they say something along the lines of, “I forgot my book!” or “MISS SAM! It’s Thursday.” I hypothesize that our StoryTime program assists the teaching of calendar skills, as each student surely knows which day they visit the library with their respective Library Specialist.

IMG_4666.JPGOn library day, I arrive at the school at least thirty minutes early. This is when I run into children as I am collecting their returned books and checking in with teachers. Once this is finished, I select the books to read.

I use StoryTime to introduce new books and also revisit familiar, favorite books. Some of the favorites in our libraries are: Don’t Push the Button by Bill Cotter, Open Very Carefully: A Book With Bite by Nick Bromley and Nicola O’Byrne, and The Polar Bear’s Underwear by Tupera Tupera. The more we re-read these books, the louder the library becomes because the students are reading along with me. Aside from the major benefits of re-reading, reading loved books is exciting. The students also know my major weakness: book requests. If a child walks into the library and asks me to read a specific title, I simply cannot resist! How does one say no to a three-year-old who asks, “Can we read Pete the Cat Buttons today?” meaning Pete the Cat and His Four Groovy Buttons.

After the stories are through, it’s time for lending! I absolutely love this process because the students have complete freedom over which book they choose. Usually, at the beginning of the year, students will simply choose the books that are on display, but after a couple of months, they know where their favorites are and ask for books read previously during Storytime.

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As I was greeting the rest of the class at the door, someone decided to be “Miss Sam” and read Pete the Cat: The Wheels on the Bus to the class!

I have been a Library Specialist with Books for Kids since September 2015, and I have read over 1,400 books during StoryTime. Almost 1,400 of those readings have been a boisterous event, but as Maya Angelou said, “Any book that helps a child to form a habit of reading, to make one of his deep and continuing needs, is good for him.” If I don’t follow Maya Angelou’s lead, then what am I doing in a library?

 

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Reading the Build-A-Home-Library book, Maria Had a Little Llama/Maria Tiene Una Llamita in English and Spanish with Mr. Chris

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By Samantha Murray Doktor, Books for Kids Program Officer.
Follow Sam her on her literacy Instagram account @gabandgrow for more book recommendations and tips.

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